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Dog behaviourist in Christchurch helping fearful, anxious, aggressive or reactive dogs reclaim a sense of calm.

Happy confident dog

If you need dog training for your fearful, anxious, aggressive or reactive dog, or you have a puppy who you'd like guidance on raising -

you're in the right place. 

Using positive and straightforward dog training methods, I help to reduce stress not only for dogs, but for their humans as well. 

I specialise in...

  • Leash reactivity

  • Generalised anxiety

  • Aggression

  • Noise phobias

  • ​Separation anxiety

  • Fear of car journeys, vet visits, handling, and more

  • Raising puppies with a focus on fear prevention

"A major breakthrough. Kylee's knowledge, patience, and gentle approach has made all the difference. We're incredibly grateful to Kylee and value her expertise."

Julie

About 

Hi! I'm Kylee, owner of Inspiring Dogs. I've always been passionate about animal health, welfare, and behaviour, and this passion drove me to veterinary nursing for nearly five years, and then establishing Inspiring Dogs in 2021 and completing an Advanced Diploma in Canine Behaviour.

I work with fearful, anxious, aggressive, or reactive dogs, as well as working to prevent all of this in puppies.  I'm continually inspired by my work in this field - helping dogs and their humans enjoy their lives together to the fullest.

Kylee Dog Behaviourist Christchurch

Some happy trained pups of Inspiring Dogs 

  • How much does it cost?
    Check out our dog behaviour prices here, and puppy training prices here.
  • How much time will I need?
    For dog behaviour, I will send you a questionnaire to fill out, then initial consults are 90 minutes long, and can be carried out either online throughout NZ, or in your home in Christchurch. Follow up sessions are 60 minutes. In between sessions you'll be working with your dog to strengthen their new skills learned in our sessions. I aim to keep the process as straightforward as possible, and if time is limited, we can collaborate to find solutions. For puppies, I will send you a questionnaire to fill out, then initial consults are 60 minutes long, and can be carried out either online throughout NZ, or in your home in Christchurch. Follow up sessions are 60 minutes. In between sessions you'll be working with your puppy to strengthen their new skills learned in our sessions. I aim to keep the process as straightforward as possible, and if time is limited, we can collaborate to find solutions. I also provide in-home puppy training to accommodate busy schedules. So, if time constraints are an issue for you, I can work with your puppy while you work.
  • What dog training methods do you use?
    I use positive, ethical, and scientifically backed dog training and behaviour modification methods. I do not use shock collar, prong collars, choke chains, slip leads, or intimidation techniques. If you are interested in learning more about the benefits of ethical dog training, check out this article from ABTC.
  • Will I need any special dog training equipment?
    Necessary training items Treats - For the day of our session, please prepare lots of tiny, delicious treats that your dog really enjoys, and have them in an easily accessible container or bag. Depending on your dog's size, breed, appetite, health and preference of your pet, this could be up to 500g of fresh sweetcorn-kernel-sized pieces of meat, cheese, fish, boiled egg, etc. in a wide-mouthed, easy-to-hold container. We might not need them all, so they can be frozen, but having lots of delicious treats is usually very helpful. Well fitted collar and/or harness, and a strong leash. Recommended training items, but not necessary A clicker and a wrist strap for your clicker - this can really help to speed up training Your dog's favourite toy Treat pouches can be invaluable to free up your hands, and have easy access to treats.
  • What can I be doing before our session?
    Protect the welfare and safety of your dog, yourself, and other people and pets, and avoid any additional negative learning. The initial phase of behaviour modification is to preserve the safety and well-being of both humans and animals, and prevent further undesirable learning through management. This means preventing the dog's exposure to problematic situations, interactions, or environments. This can entail "limiting their environment" and is meant to alleviate the pressure on the dog as well as any other animals or humans involved. Anticipate and avoid The first recommended step, management, is something you can begin implementing straight away! Avoid your dog's exposure to stressors or problematic situation until our sessions begin. Identify any problematic scenarios to anticipate and avoid them - before they pose a threat to human or animal safety or well-being. For separation-related issues, try to avoid leaving your dog alone by establishing a caretaking arrangement that ensures they're not left unsupervised until our sessions start. When dealing with human-directed fear aggression it is crucial to respect your dog's personal space and ensure the safety of everyone. Don't let strangers greet your dog if your dog is uncomfortable with strangers - cross the road if out on a walk, or put your dog in another room if you have visitors over. Avoid putting your dog in potentially stressful situations. If your dog is reactive towards other people or dogs, refrain from taking them to busy areas and avoid peak times. Take measures to prevent physical harm to individuals and other animals and shield the pet from stressful environments. Apply the above anticipate and avoid approach until our sessions start. Use physical barriers like doors, baby gates, leashes, or tethers to ensure safety where needed. Use compassionate prevention, and behavioural adjustments from humans. Prioritise the comfort and well-being of your dog, making sure they have all their needs met without causing distress. Aim for a calm and peaceful environment for your dog. Avoid punishment It is advised never to punish or correct your dog. This is ineffective and is counterintuitive to training and behaviour modification, and increases anxiety and frustration. Instead, focus on avoiding situations that may lead to issues until our session. Avoid using techniques based on establishing dominance or displaying authority. Keep a diary/take videos It can be helpful for you to gather information on triggers, and any events that may have led to the behaviour. Avoid deliberately setting up situations to provoke problem behaviour, especially if it could be distressing or unsafe. However, be prepared to naturally capture video footage of occurrences, if safe to do so. Additionally, keeping a diary of any problems that arise can help- outlining not only the behaviour of concern but also the factors that triggered it, interactions, and contexts (including human actions), as well as your responses during the behaviour.

Ready to bring out the best in your best friend?

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